Winter weather. It’s snow joke.

On Christmas Day, I showed you one of the sleighs in our transport collection. Sorry about the singing, by the way. I hope it was in tune.

Sleighs were very important vehicles in heavy snow in many parts of the world, and continued to be used long after motor cars became popular. We’ve got a handful of sleighs and sledges in our stores, including two push-sleighs at opposite ends of the glamour spectrum:

Push sledge for a child, date unknown (Science Museum)

Push sledge for a child, date unknown (Science Museum)

Ornamental Dutch push-sleigh (Science Museum / Science & Society)

Ornamental Dutch push-sleigh (Science Museum / Science & Society)

That Dutch sleigh is quite a beauty, isn’t it. What a way to travel! However, maybe you want a bit more speed, a bit more power. Well, rail travel isn’t out of the question. Last time I was at our store in West London, I enountered this great Victorian model of an ice locomotive designed for use in Russia:

Model of an ice locomotive (Science Museum / Science & Society)

Model of an ice locomotive (Science Museum / Science & Society)

Sometimes, though, it’s time to wheel out the serious kit. If you’re planning a Trans-Antarctic Expedition, this Tucker Sno-Cat might be just the job:

Tucker Sno-Cat tracked vehicle, 1955 (Science Museum)

Tucker Sno-Cat tracked vehicle, 1955 (Science Museum)

If cold-weather transport is up your street, I haven’t found much written about the history of snow and ice transport, but I did come across ‘Snow travel and transport’, by Walter Lorch (The Gawsworth Series, 1977). It’s got lots of great pictures and information, and I’m sure you could find a second-hand copy on that book website named after a big river in South America…

2 thoughts on “Winter weather. It’s snow joke.

  1. Pingback: Stories from the stores » Seven miles down, fifty years ago

  2. Hugh Bulpitt

    The Tucker Sno-cat shown is the machine that I and my late father-in-law saved from the breakers yard and took 4,000 man hours to renovated to the condition you see it now. it was a complete wreck and anon runner having spent many years out in the open at the entrance to the “International Motor Museum”.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× one = 5

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>