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Observations of a new Explainer

Post written by Explainer Sarah

Hello, I’m Sarah, one of the 12 newest Explainers here at the Science Museum.
I’ve been here nearly 3 months now, and it’s true…time does fly when you’re having fun!

I can honestly say that I have spent the majority of the time smiling and laughing!
There’s a real atmosphere of FUN here and the rest of the Explainer team are great. Everyone has been a “newie” at some point and knows what it’s like, so when you’re stuck they welcome questions and are ready to help.

Science Museum Explainers

During our first week, induction week, the 12 of us were put through our paces doing things like presentations, going on a museum treasure hunt (honestly, it was hard work!), playing team-building games and acting out some of the “Sticky Moments” that can happen when faced with the public.

A highlight had to be watching a fellow “newie” pretending to be a very non-compliant 5 year old who was lost (you know who you are!), giving the Explainer the run-around. (This actually happened to me over the Easter holidays! A very upset 5 year old running up and down outside The Garden howling “Daddy, Daddy where’s my Daddy?!”. Fortunately for me, Dad was located quickly, although he was alarmingly relaxed about it all…..unlike his poor boy!).  Although every situation we looked at had us howling with laughter, there was a real sense that we were learning something really valuable.

It was impressive that over the entire week, we were tested, observed, challenged, encouraged and supported, and we felt confident that although we had a lot to learn, we wouldn’t be thrown in at the deep end. By the end of the week we felt exhausted, but armed with our red Explainer T-shirts we were ready to get stuck into the job…Bring it on!

Crushing dry ice

During our first few weeks, let loose in the museum, we shadowed experienced Explainers. My very first task was to help collect and crush dry ice for the Icy-Bodies exhibit on Launchpad. It’s hard to believe how cold that stuff is (a chilly -78°C) but stories of past Explainers accidentally nearly getting frostbite gives you the incentive to don the geeky lab-coat and specs, along with some massive mits, and treat it with the respect it deserves!

Some of the tasks have been scarier than others. Being on Launchpad schools entrance dealing with the organised chaos on a busy, fully booked day is always an eye-opener. It is a real skill being able to compassionately calm the poor harassed teacher who has battled the tube system with 30 over-excited kids (give them a medal for bravery I say!), or the teacher whose coach broke down and is now an hour late with 60 kids.

Often you feel as if you need eight arms, and eyes in the back of your head, however the experienced Explainers are a model of calm (usually!) and are full of sensible advice and tips. As each day passes and you get stuck in, it gets more instinctive.

Every time I walk into the building in the morning I can’t quite believe I work in THE Science Museum. I feel really lucky to work with such a great bunch of people and have the opportunity to help others catch the buzz for learning about science in such an exciting way.

Explainer Fact:  We use over 6 tonnes of dry ice every year!

One thought on “Observations of a new Explainer

  1. Marilyn

    This was a really exciting and motivating blog. Sarah’s obvious enthusiasm, interest and energy for Science is really infectious. I was last at the Science Museum when I was a pupil in the sixth form at school some 50 years ago. Sarah’s descriptions of the many exhibits/experiences have now motivated me to come along again to the Museum to explore what is on offer. Thank you Sarah for renewing my interest in and enjoyment of Science. Good luck in your new job!

    Reply

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