Author Archives: Explainer Chi

3 Pigstitle

School Storytelling Events

Once upon a time, in a land far, far away the Science Museum discovered the secret recipe for telling an awesome story.

The magical ingredients included:

• Pigs x 3
• Hedgehog (awake)
• An Enormous Turnip
• Rubber Chicken

Mixed together with a sprinkle of humour and a dash of razzle dazzle – whilst gently allowing the audience’s excitement to boil over.

Storytellings are charged events performed by Explainers aimed at a Key Stage 1 (aged 5-7) audience.  Each session is full of audience participation and volunteer opportunites.

The 3 Pigs storytelling follows the traditional fairytale (but with a happy ending) and covers the topic of materials.  It reinforces the idea that different materials possess differing properties e.g. strong, heavy, light, rough etc.

3 Pigs Storytelling

The Not So Sleepy Hedgehog is story about light.  It features a hedgehog that is trying to get ready for hibernation but is scared of ‘monsters’ that are only seen in the dark.  This story goes over what a light source is, introduces reflection and how we get a shadow.

Not So Sleepy Hedgehog Storytelling

The Enormous Turnip is an epic tale all about forces and recounts the efforts of an entire family in pulling an enormous turnip from the ground; using a variety of words to describe different actions such as pushing, pulling, turning, lifting and dropping.

Enormous Turnip Storytelling

Storytelling sessions are optional and there are plenty of free activities for schools to enjoy on their visit.  They can of course explore the Museum’s galleries and see objects ranging from Stephenson’s Rocket to the Apollo 10 capsule.

Groups can also book a visit to the Garden, Pattern Pod and Launchpad interactive galleries (depending on their Key Stage).

Whatever school groups plan to do, we always try our best to make sure their visit has a happy ending and we hope they all live happily ever after…

…The End

Explainer Fact: Nearly 7000 pupils visited a storytelling last year!

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Visitor Letters – School children’s feedback forms

We love receiving letters from our visitors and we always try our best to write back as soon as possible.

In fact, most of the letters we receive are from primary schools that have just visited the Museum.

Kids being kids, they can be brutally honest in telling us their likes (e.g. big bangs!) and dislikes (e.g. also big bangs).  This was especially true when we received letters from Hazelbury School.  In fact, the pupils used our feedback forms as a template to write down their views – things that they liked, disliked and what we could do differently.

Below are a selection of feedback forms we received from the children.  Click on any image to enlarge.

The letter below shows our response and appreciation towards the children’s efforts (click to enlarge).

Explainer Fact: If your little ones would like to send us a letter, please send it to: Launchpad Letters, Science Museum, London, SW7 2DD

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Visitor Inventions – Adult ideas

It’s not just our younger visitors who love drawing their ideas down on paper whilst inside our Launchpad gallery – adults do too!  Especially after a bit of alcohol and some silent discoing during one of our Science Museum Lates, which happen on the last Wednesday of every month except December.

Below are a selection of inventions drawn by some of our larger visitors – click  on any image to see bigger pictures.

Science Museum Live on Tour

Post written by Explainer Amanda

A spotlight follows a child as he or she makes their way to the stage. The audience chants “Push the button! Push the button!” A giant red button is pushed, thus beginning not only a chain reaction machine, but also Science Museum Live on Tour.

Science Museum Live On Tour Poster

Science Museum Live, the Science Museum’s first ever live theatrical tour, toured theatres throughout England and Wales from January to May 2011. Mark McKinley and I (Amanda Mahr) performed almost 100 shows in just under 50 venues.

Incorporating Key Stage 2 (7-11) and Key Stage 3 (11-14) science, Science Museum Live was aimed mainly at families on a night out to the theatre with school groups largely attending during matinees.

The show flip-flopped between silly scenarios and serious science with fun as the underlying element to both. For one scene, Mark and I dressed up in sumo costumes as Robert Hooke and Isaac Newton in order to wrestle over who truly discovered gravity. In another, I played a magician while Mark played my glamorous assistant (complete with feather boa and heels of course) as we demonstrated the “magic of science” through a series of experiments.

Amanda and Mark demonstrating an experiment

Amanda and Mark demonstrating an experiment

More serious scenes included using liquid nitrogen to create a banana hammer (proved by its competency at hammering a nail into a block of wood) and by building a hovercraft onstage using a slab of wood we “just had lying around” and a leaf blower in order to help an innocent volunteer re-enact Christopher Cockerell’s (hovercraft inventor) maiden hovercraft voyage from Dover to Calais!

Using liquid nitrogen to make a banana hammer

Using liquid nitrogen to make a banana hammer

Science Museum Live was extremely fast-paced and fun. It was enjoyed by both young and older audience members throughout the UK, as well as the crew members from each new theatre! We managed to reach out to many families who would be unable to visit the Museum. Through Science Museum Live, the Science Museum was able to branch out from schools and the Museum itself into a whole new means of entertainment: live theatre.

Explainer Fact: The second season of Science Museum Live (complete with new demonstrations) will be touring again beginning in January 2012 (tour dates).

Giant LEGO inside the Garden gallery

The Garden Gallery (plus LEGO!)

There’s a keyboard player and a drummer ready to play some uplifting tunes below a giant disco ball.

No, I’m not talking about a 1970s inspired Glee episode. I am of course talking about our Garden interactive gallery!

It may not look like a typical garden – for a start it’s indoors. However, with a bit of imagination and some tenuous links, things are more similar than they first appear.

The giant shimmering disco ball on the ceiling represents our sun; tweeting song birds are replaced by a voice changer, an echo machine and musical instruments; long plastic yellow spaghetti is our flora; the water area is our pond and we have a tree house (without the tree part) as well. Throw in some giant LEGO and a big red skip and there you have it – a garden.

The Garden Gallery - Water area (left), Giant LEGO (far-centre), Treehouse (right)

The Garden Gallery – Water area (left), Giant LEGO (far-centre), Treehouse (right)

Our flora - yellow spaghetti

Our flora – yellow spaghetti

The water area is without a doubt the most popular exhibit within the Garden, although in my opinion it’s all about the giant LEGO. Our visitors can be so creative, building anything from animals to armchairs.

Below shows reconstructed creations that our visitors have built.

Explainer Fact: We have a selection of hand puppets that include a hedgehog, a red squirrel and a strange mutated crow that has separate arms and wings!

Flat Stanley in front of the Apollo 10 capsule

Visitor Letters – Flat Stanley’s adventures at the Science Museum

We love receiving letters from our visitors.

In fact, most of the letters we receive are from primary schools that have just visited the Museum.

Kids being kids, they can be brutally honest in telling us their likes (e.g. big bangs!) and dislikes (e.g. also big bangs). Most letters read like a story from when the kids got off the bus to the galleries they visited and then eventually concluding with what they bought from our Museum shop.

We always try our best to write back as soon as possible. Recently we received a request from a girl called Molly, whose school project was to have a character called ‘Flat Stanley’ being sent to the Science Museum for an adventure (click to enlarge).

Molly's letter telling us about Flat Stanley
It was our task to take photos of ‘Flat Stanley’ around different objects inside the Museum to keep a record of his epic adventure, as shown below:

Explainer Fact: If your little ones would like to send us a letter, please send it to: Launchpad Letters, Science Museum, London, SW7 2DD

'Holding' projected fish

The Pattern Pod Gallery

What do spirals, duck feet, computer animated fish and a dance room have in common? Yep, you’ve guessed it! They all feature in our Pattern Pod interactive gallery for kids aged 5 to 8.

As the name of the gallery suggests, this gallery is all about patterns. Patterns that you can see, hear and touch. It introduces the idea that there are patterns all around us and that recognising patterns is an important skill (especially in science).

Just like our other interactive galleries, when school groups book a visit, we provide a quick briefing before the kiddies go off and explore. The rules are simple. Don’t leave, don’t run and finally… have FUN!!!! And there’s a lot of fun to be had.

For starters in the centre of the gallery there’s a projection of animated fish that responds to movement. Children enjoy nothing more than to chase and stomp on the fishes. The magic of Disney is also evident when they shout out “Nemo!” to every clownfish that swims by. Some little ones also try and feed the fish with foam tiles from the nearby tessellation exhibit. But with some guidance, you can actually ‘hold’ and (with some dodgy slight of hand) even catch the fish!

Afterwards they can plant a pattern, walk like a dog or even strut their stuff in our psychedelic dance room that tracks your body movements and plays the same 3 tunes over and over again… a pattern as it were.

And finally we have the kaleido-patterns, where visitors can showboat their artistic flair and investigate rotational symmetry.

Whatever you choose to do within the gallery, always remember the very important third rule – have FUN!!!

Explainer Fact: Over 1000 pupils can visit the Pattern Pod with their school groups each week

Lottolab at the Science Museum

Post Written by Explainer Dominique

Think a science lab is full of glass beakers and Bunsen burners? You obviously haven’t been to Lottolab!

Lottolab is the world’s first public perception research space set up by Beau Lotto and his team here at the Science Museum. Through their research, they seek to deepen both our scientific and philosophical understanding of human perception. Helping them is a team of young budding scientists from the ‘i, Scientist’ project.

The ‘i, Scientist’ project is a series of workshops that encourages school children to change the way they think about science and themselves. As an Explainer, I’ve been assisting with the project - showing the children and the Lottolab team around the Museum and generally helping out.

Pupils working on the 'I, Scientist' project

The project takes children aged 5-18 from different schools and gets them to work together to ask questions, design real experiments and analyse data before coming to their own conclusions. It’s been great to see the children develop their understanding and appreciation of science.

iScientist blindfold game

A student scientist gives guidance to a test participant, who is attempting to follow a path using sound alone. In the background, other students carefully gather data on the accuracy and speed of the participant as part of their experiment.

One of the schools – Anson Primary made this ‘trailer’ for their experiments.

The ‘I, Scientist’ project is currently in its 2nd year with the aim of extending the programme to many more schools around the country. Check out some of the work done in last years ‘I, Scientist’ project in this film.

Come along and experience the weird and wonderful Lottolab for yourselves.

Explainer Fact: The experiment developed in the 1st year of ‘I, Scientist’ involved finding your way around a path whilst blindfolded.

The hamster powered vegetable garden

Visitor Inventions

Hamster-powered vegetable gardens, multi-tasking hats with limbs and rubber-producing clouds. Our visitors are a creative lot.

We give our visitors the tools (colouring pencils and paper) to doodle down any ideas they have whilst in our Launchpad gallery.

Some creations are pure genius. Others, lets face it, are a bit weird. However, there is definitely a common theme. Most of the inventions we get from the kiddies are either about food or homework/housework robots. Basically anything that makes their lives easier.

Here’s a small selection of the inventions drawn up by some of our imaginative visitors. Click on any image to see bigger pictures.

Explainer Fact: We get through 100,000 paper trace cards every year (used ones get recycled).

Giant cockroach drama character

Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton and the world’s first pregnant man – these are just a few of the characters brought to life by actors inside the Museum.

Today I met a real-life giant cockroach (the actor’s name is Guy) who is kind enough to give humans a tour of the Science Museum from this critter’s perspective. Here’s what Professor John Cockroach had to say:

“Ah nice to meet another friendly cockroach face! Quick, join in. Don’t forget to put on your weekend ‘best’. Going among the humans, we’re all to be on our best cockroach behaviour.

Now, you’re probably wondering why we cockroaches are gathering here?

Well, as cockroaches, we forget – don’t we? – we haven’t had to evolve for, well, millions of years. We are, after all, pretty much the same as we were when there were dinosaurs. Humans, bless ‘em, clearly still have a long way to go. But they’re trying, obviously, so we mustn’t judge them too harshly. That would be very uncockroach of us, wouldn’t it?

Human beings are so fascinating. D’you know, they change their own environment to solve their problems rather than evolve? Yes, they have a strange habit of constructing things and when they’ve finished they sometimes put those things in a room and call it a museum. How strange!

So, being a cockroach professor of humanology, ahem, I lead a group of you cockroaches, on a quick scuttle around, as it were, for about 30 minutes.

We’ll see how humans seem absolutely obsessed with something they call time. Many of them can’t even eat, sleep, or indeed leave the house without first ‘checking the time’.

We’ll see plenty of examples of their machines too, how they try to save time, kill time, and how they love to burn things in order to go faster and faster.

Just a quick reminder, though, to any of our cockroach visitors. Please don’t expect to feed the humans. Sorry, but they’re very fussy eaters and have quite strict feeding times.”

Cockroaches studing the Apollo 10 capsule

Cockroaches studying the Apollo 10 capsule

If dressing up as a giant cockroach and participating in a unique tour sounds like fun, sign up for a Cockroach Tour of the Science Museum.

A big thanks to Guy for his contribution to this post!