Tag Archives: Google

Lots of volunteers for the 'It Takes Guts' show

A ‘Day at the Museum’ with Google

How do you inspire the next generation of scientists?

This was just one of the many questions that Google set out to answer this summer with help from the Science Museum’s Outreach and Resources Team.

The Outreach team usually works outside the Museum, but for four days in June we were based inside and put on a ‘Day at the Museum’ event which was sponsored by Google. 600 children aged 10-11 from 12 schools across the capital came to visit us, and were treated to a jam-packed day of science activities.

Lots of volunteers for the ‘It Takes Guts’ show

The children started their day all together, watching the ‘It Takes Guts’ show; an interactive science show all about the Digestive system. Here they got to experience the journey our food takes once it enters our mouths, and answer some of those burning questions, like “why is our poo brown?”. Having been thoroughly entertained and a little ‘grossed out’ they headed off to their other activities.

The grand finale to the digestive system journey!

The grand finale to the digestive system journey!

In the News and Views workshop, the children got the chance to become science reporters, working in teams to create an article based around an open question on a science topic. To start the workshop we asked the children what came to mind when they thought of scientists, and as you can imagine, many of the answers centred around lab coats, goggles and ‘crazy hair’.

We then challenged these perceptions by introducing real scientists (none of whom were wearing labcoats, and all with perfectly nice hair), who came to present the research they are working on.

The children are interested to find out more from Neuroscientist Anita

The children are interested to find out more from Neuroscientist Anita

Neuroscientist Anita spoke about her research into links between attention in children and video games. Ask any room of year 6 pupils about video games and I guarantee the majority will be instantly in favour. After listening to Anita however, they began to think more critically, and started to identify pro’s and con’s to put into their articles. The sessions also gave the children a chance to learn some interesting science that wouldn’t have been covered in the classroom, such as seeing first hand the effects capsaicin (the active ingredient in chillis) had on their teachers!

The students begin to build their article, on the topic of antibiotic resistance

The students begin to build their article, on the topic of antibiotic resistance

A trip to the Museum however would not be complete without visiting some of our galleries. The students got the chance to try out some science experiments for themselves using the interactive exhibits in Launchpad.

Working in a team to build your own bridge! One of teh many ways science is explored interactively in Launchpad

Working in a team to build your own bridge! One of the many ways science is explored interactively in Launchpad

They also explored some of our amazing objects that shaped the history of science, as part of the Great Object Hunt in Making the Modern World and our new Information Age galleries.

Hunting for some science treasures in the Making the Modern World gallery

Hunting for some science treasures in the Making the Modern World gallery

At the end of the day we bid farewell to the children, who left with smiles on their faces and also a goody bag of science museum trinkets, including a ‘Golden Ticket’ for themselves and their families to come back again and see a film in our IMAX cinema.

copygoodybags

Thanks Google and the Science Museum!

When asking the children in the News and Views workshop what a scientist is, one child answered “it’s just someone who really likes science and finding out about the world”. Hopefully the children who visited us went home having not only had a brilliant experience at the museum, but also all sharing the view that science is a vast and interesting field, where there really is something for everyone.

Google Chrome Web Lab in the Science Museum

Web Lab: See the magic of the web brought to life

Hello there! John and Saam here. We’re two of the crack team of facilitators at the Google Chrome Web Lab, here in the Science Museum.

What’s Web Lab, we hear you ask? It’s a new, interactive exhibition based at the Science Museum about the Internet and the World Wide Web. However, visitors from across the world can also – rather amazingly – visit the exhibition and take part in all of our experiments online at chromeweblab.com

[yframe url='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrgjufJhmwk']

One of the special things about Web Lab is that it explores the connection between virtual users (on the website) and physical users (in the gallery) – forming a global community. We do that through a series of five unique, web-based experiments.

Google Chrome Web Lab in the Science Museum

There’s the Data Tracer image search, the Universal Orchestra, the Teleporter live stream, the Lab Tag explorer, and arguably the favourite for many visitors, the Sketchbot, that can draw your face in sand!

The experiments are all FUN but they also help you understand how things work on the web. For example, the sketchbots show how the web uses computer languages and protocols to tell machines what to do. The Orchestra, on the other hand, demonstrates the use of ‘web sockets’ to enable two-way communication and real-time interaction over the web, and the Teleporter teaches you about how web technologies use compression to send large amounts of data quickly over vast distances.

Data Tracker, one of 5 Google Chrome experiments in Web Lab

We’ll tell you more about all the experiments in future blogs, but if you’re eager to find out more information right now, visit Web Lab or pop into the Museum, and we’ll be happy to run through the experiments with you in person!

Fun fact to impress your friends: what’s the difference between the internet and the World Wide Web? The Internet is the global network of computers all talking to each other. The Web, on the other hand, is the system of hypertext documents, such as this web page that sits on the Internet, which you can explore with your browser.