Tag Archives: history

Nine Things You Didn’t Know About the Science Museum

Curator Peter Morris shares nine unusual facts about the Science Museum to celebrate our 105th birthday today (26 June 1909).

1. The Science Museum was officially established on 26 June 1909 thanks, in part, to the work of Sir Robert Morant, a Civil Servant who also laid the foundations for the NHS and the Medical Research Council. Both the Science Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum (our neighbours) were originally known as the South Kensington Museum, which opened in 1858.

The Exhibition Road entrance to the Science Museum, 1905. Credit: Science Museum/SSPL

The Exhibition Road entrance to the Science Museum in 1905. Credit: Science Museum/SSPL

2. The Wright flyer, the world’s first heavier than air aircraft to fly, was originally displayed at the Science Museum. Orville Wright refused to donate the aircraft to the Smithsonian museum, instead loaning it to the Science Museum in 1928. The Science Museum had a replica of the aircraft built (on display in the Flight gallery) before returning the original to the Smithsonian in 1948.

Ceremony marking the return of the Wright Flyer, Science Museum, 1948.

Ceremony marking the return of the Wright Flyer, Science Museum, 1948. Credit: Science Museum / SSPL

3. Some scenes in the Ipcress File, the thriller starring a young Michael Caine, were filmed in the old Science Museum Library in 1964.

4. Stephenson’s Rocket, one of the most famous steam locomotives in the world, was stored at Brocket Hall in Hertfordshire during World War II. Brocket Hall is often used for filming, most notably the BBC TV version of “Pride and Prejudice” starring Colin Firth.

Stephenson's Rocket, on display in the Making the Modern World gallery. Credit: Science Museum

Stephenson’s Rocket, on display in the Making the Modern World gallery. Credit: Science Museum

5. For three decades, between the 1930s and the 1960s, the Science Museum planned to put a planetarium on the top floor of the museum. The plans were dropped after Madame Tussauds opened the London Planetarium in 1958.

6. The Science Museum has held temporary exhibitions on typewriters, noise abatement, razors and Dr Who. Current temporary exhibitions feature everything from 3D Printing to Psychology, a giant 27ft horn loudspeaker and an exhibition about rubbish.

7. The Science Museum shared its premises with the Imperial War Museum between 1924 and 1935.

8. An automatic door, originally part of a temporary exhibition on photoelectric cells in 1933, is still on display today in the Secret Life of the Home gallery. It works on by breaking a beam of light shining on a photoelectric cell, and not via a pressure pad which opens most supermarket doors today.

9. The first ‘Children’s Gallery’ in the Museum opened in December 1931. It aimed to stimulate the curiosity of children, and included a large number of working models. The Science Museum’s Launchpad and Pattern Pod interactive galleries still have the same aim today.

Schoolboys in the Children's Gallery of the Science Museum, March 1934.

Schoolboys in the Children’s Gallery of the Science Museum, March 1934. Credit: Science Museum/SSPL.

All these facts and more can be found in Science for the Nation, a book about the Science Museum’s history which is available in the Museum Shop.

The BBC’s 2LO transmitter

Research: putting a very big ‘open’ sign on the door

By Tim Boon, Head of Research & Public History

At the end of last month, the Science Museum Group formally launched its new Research and Public History Department. Research is at the heart of every great museum; without it we cannot understand the stories our collections tell, how our audiences engage, or how to slow the deterioration of our objects.

BBC Horizon producers discuss the programme’s history at the Science Museum

Horizon producers discussing the programme’s history at a recent AHRC-funded event organised by the Research & Public History Department.

If research is so central, it may seem odd that we are having this launch now in 2012. And, of course, research has always had a role at the Museum. But what this launch signifies is a hunger to do more, in a greater variety of ways, and with an increasingly diverse range of partners.

Any scholar intrigued by the Museum’s collections, its galleries, or curious about the way that its galleries act as a public space for science and technology, is invited to work with us to delve deeper and to understand better; to research with us.

The BBC’s 2LO transmitter

The BBC’s 2LO transmitter, subject of a recently-completed AHRC-funded collaborative doctorate.

Ludmilla Jordanova, the eminent historian and Science Museum Group Trustee, argued at the opening event that, “it is fitting that a group of museums about ‘science’, which in many languages still has the broad meaning of knowledge and learning, should use and foster a wide range of approaches to understanding some of the most central phenomena of human existence, namely science in its more specific sense, medicine and technology.”

But what is research? Ludmilla suggested that it is ‘sustained nosiness’; that it is a kind of ‘systematic curiosity’. This definition gives a clue to that other phrase in our title, public history. At one level, academic research is simply a more intensive version of what all of us do when we visit a museum or gallery with a wish to understand more and better.

So, we are interested in how our visitors think about the history of science, and in developing insights that will enable us to attune our offer better. But we also know that the academics who work with us – historians, education experts, geographers, media scholars and many others – bring new and exciting ways of seeing from their own disciplines.

The research door is open; we encourage you to come in.