Tag Archives: careers

#overlyhonestmethods

#overlyhonestmethods

Have any of you been following this hashtag lately? It’s absolutely brilliant!

What started with one neuroscientist, dr_Leigh, venting her frustration (and sense of humour!) with her student by tweeting that ’ incubation lasted three days because this is how long the undergrad forgot the experiment in the fridge #overlyhonestmethods’, has snowballed into loads of other scientists around the world revealing the often-hilarious realities of life in the lab.

For any of us who have been there, rigging up experiments with make-do-and-mend equipment (I used to call it the ‘scotch tape and toothpicks method’) the tweets ring true and will make you laugh (with agreement and relief). For those who haven’t been there, reading these tweets brings a refreshing blast of honesty to sweep away some of the misconceptions that laypeople have about scientists.

#overlyhonestmethods continues revealing the world of science

Guess what- they are just like everyone else!

Their work is often confusing and messy. They are overworked, underpaid and fuelled by caffeine, sometimes they cut corners, like anyone who gets tired of repeating the same lengthy process a dozen times over. Occasionally that corner-cutting leads to a new method, and better results. Sometimes they spend far too long thinking of witty titles for their papers, because it might mean getting published in a higher-impact journal- just like the newspapers favour attention grabbing headlines. Sometimes they set off explosions just to see what happens!

The real nature of science is not perfect experiments designed to demonstrate an unequivocal point, carried out by stern geniuses who never crack a smile- scientists are not just their job- they are people like any of us, who mess up all the time, but try again and learn something from it- even if its just to set a timer on their experiments!

 Your students might be amused, and pleasantly surprised to see some of the tweets… Hooray for #overlyhonestmethods- keep it rolling!

Science GRRLS

A couple weeks ago, the European Commission launched its ‘Science: it’s a girl thing’ campaign to encourage girls to study science and consider science careers. An important message, of course, but the video which was released to promote it received a huge backlash (justifiably!).  It did absolutely nothing to stir aspirations or promote the potential of exciting science careers  (looks like it’s  just high heels and cosmetics, girls). 

These ladies , on the other hand, are poster girls for women in HOT science careers, genuine role models for girls considering (or not) whether to study science. From NASA astronauts to the Surgeon General, to founding Flickr, these women are out there now, getting on with it! (Whilst being inspiring and amazing).

Peggy Whitson, a heroine of science & technology

Peggy Whitson, a heroine of science & technology

Have a look and remind your girls that studying science does not necessarily mean working in a lab- far from it! There are a multitude of science career paths to travel, and even if they want to work in the Arts, in Finance etc; studying science means they can go on to do just about anything because the skills they will learn apply to many other disciplines, and to life!

yes, passionate science girl here :)

The Big Bang Fair @ScienceMuseum

Happening tomorrow… The Science Museum is proudly hosting the Big Bang London and South East

It will be a day of hands-on science and engineering activities, fun workshops, and awesome, inspiring projects presented by young people from across the region (I am always blown away by the incredible work of the UK’s bright young minds!)

Come soak up the science, pick up some great ideas for your classroom or science clubs, and get your students excited about careers in STEM… oh, and take a few minutes to explore the Museum while you’re here.

See you all tomorrow!

The Big Bang Fair is in London!

The Big Bang Fair is in London!

The Big Bang Fair- were you there?

We were. And we had a fantastic time meeting students, educators and even Prof Brian Cox whilst working on the Science Museum stand at the fair! Oh, and gawking at the amazing flying penguins.

AirPenguins by engineering company Festo captivated us at the Big Bang Fair

The Big Bang Fair is a wonderful science festival for young people, promoting careers in science and showcasing young people’s STEM projects from across the UK- from marine biology to product design. These inspiring young participants were finalists in the National Science and Engineering Competition, and their STEM projects had made it all the way through from the heats at regional Big Bang Fairs, to the national Finals which took place last weekend in London. A huge well done to everyone who was there, engaging people with their research and sharing their hard work and successes with other students!

So if your students are carrying out a project, be it at home, in school or as part of a club, think about getting involved. Your students may find themselves presenting their research at a regional fair, one of which we are excited to be hosting here at the Science Museum on 22nd June 2011.

See you there!