Tag Archives: engineering

BIG BANG and getting BIGGER!

Guess where we were last week?

The Big Bang Fair, of course! Where were YOU?

We were  on the Science Museum stand for 3 days, doing experiments from carbon dioxide bubbles to three-way balancing, and meeting lots of excited students, teachers and families.

The Science Museum stand at the Big Bang - always a hive of activity!

The Science Museum stand at the Big Bang - always a hive of activity!

We had a brilliant- if exhausting- time (I see one teacher on the far left who is looking ever more knackered than us!) and were amazed to see how huge the fair has gotten. It’s not just the Big Bang anymore, its the MASSIVE Bang now. It filled two whole giant halls at the Birmingham NEC! It’s exciting to think that in only a few years since its inception, it has become such a massive destination for young people to explore careers in science.

We think the most wonderful, inspiring part of it all are the young scientists who brought their projects to the fair, creating displays to showcase their work and talking to the public and school groups about what they did. Projects as simple and beautiful as multi-density fruit cocktails, or as intricate and brilliant as a washing machine made entirely of salvaged materials – these young engineers and scientists BLEW US AWAY.

They were competing for the Young Engineers of the Year award, and, frankly, all deserved a prize just for being there.

And delightfully, we discovered that one of the judges for the Award is our very own inventor-in-residence, Mark Champkins. He is everywhere these days!

Were you at the Big Bang this year? What did you think?

Busy ‘bots

SO! It’s half-term. Many of you are busy taking a well-deserved rest (STOP WORKING!) and some of you might even be thinking of visiting the museum.

If you do, make sure you head to the Antenna gallery, on the ground floor, to check out Robots to the Rescue, a live event featuring an incredible robot that will do incredible things, and meet the University of Warwick engineers who’ve developed it.

The future of seach and rescue?

The future of seach and rescue?

 This hardy little ‘bot is designed to navigate rough terrain and hunt for signs of life - searching  dangerous disaster zones such as collapsed buildings, making it easier and safer for rescuers to find their way to survivors.

They are only here until tomorrow so make haste!

If you can’t make it to see them, Futurecade’s Robo-Lobster game might make you feel better. Control your mine-seeking robots to keep the harbour safe from attack! The game is based around the idea of robots doing dangerous jobs so humans don’t have to, just like University of Warwick’s rescue robot will do one day.

So will robots just keep improving our lives? What kind of tasks are you happy for robots to take on?