Tag Archives: informal learning

A Futurecade Review

My name is Essence H. and I am 14 years old. Today I am writing a review on Futurecade digital games as part of my work experience at the Science Museum.

After playing all 4 games, I concluded that the one I enjoyed the most was ‘Robo Lobster’ which is about robots destroying sea mines so humans don’t have to. I enjoyed this game the most because I found it quite easy to get into and a fun game to play. I also find the idea of robots taking over the jobs of humans quite interesting as these games are based on real scientific research happening today. Although I enjoyed ‘Robo lobster’ the most, if you actually link all these games to real life and consider the idea of them being actual scientific research, then they are all interesting in their own way.

Robo-Lobster is about using robots to destroy sea mines

Robo-Lobster is about using robots to destroy sea mines

In my opinion, starting a lesson off by playing Futurecade could be a good idea because it can act as an icebreaker or introduction into the topic, as it would be something new. Or it would be a good idea to have Futurecade at the end to conclude the lesson- because students would already have prior knowledge of the topic which they would have learnt that lesson, to link in with the games so the understanding and interest level may be higher.

Another point is, especially reaching KS4 like I have in year 10, learning can become slightly stagnant and it’s quite easy to lose interest and focus in a lesson. The idea of learning through games is something different and more fun than a whole lesson of your teacher explaining something verbally.

To any teachers interested in using Futurecade to help teach a topic, I would definitely say go with it! I think it’s a good idea particularly with KS3 students to help them examine the ethical and moral implications of using and applying science.  I would say a reasonable timescale to let the children spend on Futurecade would be about 10-15 minutes and include it in maybe 2 lessons (not more than that because once you’ve played them a few times the interest level of the games drops slightly). If they wish to play the games for longer, they can always access it for themselves at home which can lead to further independent study.

In conclusion I approve of Futurecade and definitely think we should include lots more games to help link in across the school’s curriculum!

Thanks for your time Essence – hopefully you’ll fly the Futurecade banner back in school! Futurecade has been shortlisted for a BETT award in the ‘secondary digital content’ category, which we’re thrilled about. If you’re using Futurecade in the classroom make sure you check out our support notes which are packed with background science, lesson ideas and facilitation questions for discussion.

Let us know how you use them!

Talk Science Seminar

The Talk Science Seminar is something we are all excited about, have been busily preparing for, and happens on Wednesday!  It’s the first in a series of seminars exploring the potential of museum collections to support the teaching of science. 

As we who work in museums know, collections and the stories they tell are wonderful sources of inspiration, stimulating awe (‘that’s REALLY been to the Moon!’) and creativity; objects can open up discussion around science today and in the context of history, making links between technology and its implications on society. 

Would you have bought a ticket to fly on the first passenger plane?

How can we use our collections to support science teaching at all levels? Can we bring the museum learning philosophy to the classroom? What can we gain by doing so, and what are the challenges?

We’d like the seminars to be an opportunity to address these questions from different angles, as well as a forum for ideas- so they are open to anyone who has an interest in this.

So whether you are a museum or a science centre professional, a teacher or educator, a scientist, or undertaking a museum studies degree- we welcome you to come explore and discuss how we can use our collections to engage young people (and others) with science.

 We are excited to see where this takes us- the findings from this Wednesday will be disseminated online (watch this space), and if you would like to register your interest for future seminars, drop us an email at Learningresources@sciencemuseum.ac.uk

Hope to see you here soon!