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Guest authors

A number of guest authors, from scientists to artists, contribute to our blog, taking you behind the scenes, exploring the incredible objects in our collection, our award-winning exhibitions and the scientific achievements making headlines today.

Professor Christian Laes discusses perceptions of disability and the idealised body in ancient Greek culture, revealing how these ancient representations of bodily forms have influenced modern ideals towards conformity.

Assistant curator Katie Mcnab explores the life and work of Dr Nancy Roman, an American Astronomer who was the Chief of Astronomy at NASA for 20 years and earned the exemplary nickname ‘the mother of Hubble’.

Greek Independence Day is celebrated on 25 March, at the Science Museum we are commemorating this anniversary by reflecting on the contributions of one key individual in the recorded history of the study of Mathematics, the ancient Greek philosopher Euclid.

Far from being a fixed entity, the story of Greek science is a work in progress with its own meta-history. Dr. Patricia Fara explores the current story and factors that have influenced this narrative so far.

When Alexander Graham Bell first presented his telephone to audiences in the late 1800s, he made an interesting proposition. Bell suggested that this “talking telegraph” (the telephone) might be used for something other than transmitting and receiving messages. He suggested this invention could one day be used for something far more important – fun.

To mark the opening of Ancient Greeks: Science and Wisdom, Dr Despina Ignatiadou from the National Archaeological Museum Athens discusses the story of Hermes, messenger of the Gods, exploring his significance through the artefacts devoted to him.

Brazil’s Amazon rainforest is crucial to the Earth’s climate and biodiversity, but this unique ecosystem faces increasing threats. Our latest exhibition Amazônia, presented by photographer Sebastião Salgado, winner of the 2021 Praemium Imperiale award, uncovers the Amazon at this vital moment.

Curator Emeritus Andrew Nahum reflects on Alan Turing’s only known visit to the Science Museum, which took place in August 1951.