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Romanov murder mystery: launch of The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/romanov-murder-mystery-launch-of-the-last-tsar-blood-and-revolution/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs, on the launch of new exhibition The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution.

The strange allure of sad songs, and other musical mysteries

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/the-strange-allure-of-sad-songs-and-other-musical-mysteries/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield discusses an improvised musical encounter between musician Joe Stilgoe, polymath Philip Ball and the Museum’s IMAX audience.

Surprise solar storm underlines need for citizen science experiment

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/surprise-solar-storm-underlines-need-for-citizen-science-experiment/
By Roger Highfield and Harry Cliff

The Carrington Event of 1859 is the most violent solar storm on record. A storm of its magnitude in today’s technological era would cause devastating effects. Roger Highfield and Dr Harry Cliff explore more.

FIRST IVF BABY LOUISE BROWN CELEBRATES 40TH AT THE SCIENCE MUSEUM

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/first-ivf-baby-louise-brown-celebrates-40th-at-the-science-museum/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs, celebrates the anniversary of the birth that changed reproductive science.

IVF REVOLUTION: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/ivf-revolution-past-present-and-future/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs, examines the reproductive science revolution to mark our new exhibition, IVF: 6 Million Babies Later.

‘Tragedy of the Commons’ updated to model climate change

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/tragedy-of-the-commons-updated-to-model-climate-change/
By Roger Highfield

As the museum prepares to explore climate change in Antarctica through dance next month, Roger Highfield reports on the latest insights from game theorists.

How long should we grow human embryos in the lab?

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/how-long-should-we-grow-human-embryos-in-the-lab/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield discusses the ethical dimensions of reproductive science to mark our new exhibition, IVF: 6 Million Babies Later.

Can planet-sized ‘waves’ on the Sun help predict damaging solar storms?

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/can-planet-sized-waves-on-the-sun-help-predict-damaging-solar-storms/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs, describes efforts to predict solar storms as the museum prepared to launch a major new exhibition about the Sun.

Adventures in the Anthropocene by Alexander von Humboldt, father of environmentalism

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/adventures-in-the-anthropocene-by-alexander-von-humboldt-father-of-environmentalism/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield describes a recent encounter between Royal Society science book prize winners Andrea Wulf and Gaia Vince, held in the museum to celebrate Wulf’s latest prize, awarded by the British Society for the History of Science.

Quantum Computing: What, Who, How and When?

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/quantum-computing-what-who-how-and-when/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield presents your guide to Quantum Computing.

Women Dominate Prestigious European Inventor Award

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/women-dominate-prestigious-european-inventor-award/
By Roger Highfield

Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs and one of the judges of the European Inventor Award 2018, takes us through some of the highlights from this year’s ceremony.

Making the ‘Perfect Body’

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/making-the-perfect-body/
By Alice Roberts

The museum’s Roger Highfield challenged Professor Alice Roberts to iron out the scars of human evolution for a new display. Here, the University of Birmingham anatomist describes her personal quest for perfection.