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The eagerly anticipated Scientists meet the Media party took place at the Royal Society last week, continuing a long tradition of annual gatherings to foster mutual understanding between the inhabitants of Fleet Street and Britain’s laboratories. Speeches to the audience of several hundred in the world’s oldest academy of science were given by new President of the Royal Society, Nobel laureate Sir Venkatraman Ramakrishnan; Ian Blatchford, Director of the Science Museum Group, and John Mulholland, editor of The Observer. As […]

Electron density map and model of Penicillin.

The things and objects of history are important because they provide a tangible connection to the past. Seeing, or better yet holding and touching, the stuff that generations now dead made and worked with enlivens history, shucking us from the present and its endless clamour for our attention. The Hidden Structures exhibition at the Science Museum trips us into the history of X-ray crystallography with a small but intriguing display of objects from the 1940s through to the 1970s. The […]

How many people do you know that have had a cataracts operation? Cataract (the clouding of the lens of the eye) have been operated on for hundreds of years. One of the earliest operations was couching – pushing the clouded lens out of the way to restore some vision. By the 1740s, methods were developed to remove the lens completely. However it wasn’t until the 1940s, that a successful artificial alternative to the eye’s lens was found, the intra-ocular lens. While working […]

To celebrate the centenary of X-ray crystallography, the Science Museum has just opened Hidden Structures, a new display of molecular models made using the technique writes Boris Jardine