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women in science

Helen Sharman

Helen Sharman, the first Briton in space, reflects on her mission to the Mir space station 25 years ago. You can visit Helen’s website here. Space missions capture the imagination. They turn people on to science. They broaden our horizons too. I can hardly believe that it has been 25 years since I played my small part in this great adventure, the next phase of human exploration. My journey into space began in 1989 after I had answered an advertisement on my car […]

Our Ada Lovelace exhibition celebrates the bicentenary of Ada’s birth (10 December 1815) and opened on Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of the achievements of women in science, technology, engineering and maths. When Ada Lovelace had her portrait painted in 1835, she joked that her jaw appeared so large that the word ‘Mathematics’ could be written upon it. Mathematics and science were Lovelace’s passions and were often at the forefront of her thoughts. She spent much of her time studying […]

Today (10 December 2014) marks exactly 50 years since Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, on 10 December, 1964. Hodgkin won the prestigious prize “for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances”. She was only the third woman to win the prestigious prize – the crowning achievement of a 30 year career spent unraveling the structures of proteins, including insulin. Hodgkin first found fame when she finally solved the structure of […]

Dr Ellen Stofan, NASA’s Chief Scientist, in front of the Apollo 10 Command Module. Credit: CaSE

Dr Ellen Stofan, NASA’s Chief Scientist, gave the Campaign for Science and Engineering’s 24th Annual Distinguished Lecture at the Science Museum.

By Roger Highfield, Director of External Affairs Google today celebrates the life of the Nobel-prize-winning chemist Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910-1994) with a Doodle on its homepage. Here you can see the inspiration for the Doodle on what would have been her 104th birthday, her historic image of the three dimensional atomic structure of penicillin, which she deduced with a method called X ray crystallography. Because it was not possible to focus X rays scattered by the penicillin, Hodgkin used large […]