Skip to content

biology

As part of our recent exhibition The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution, rare disease expert, Dr Matthew Lumley, explains how the future is much brighter for people living with haemophilia today.

A dried down culture of the fungus Penicillium rubens derived from Sir Alexander Flemings penicillin producing strain, deposited in the CABI (Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International) culture collection in the 1940s. This dish contains penicillium spores taken from Alexander Fleming’s research plates. By being fungal spores, this growth from 2017 is a clone of the penicillium that is commonly benchmarked as the first recorded observation of penicillin in 1928. The publication of his findings from this mould would lead him to share the Nobel Prize with associates Fleury and Chain in 1945.

Genetic Resource Collection Curator at the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, Matthew Ryan, explores Fleming’s Penicillium and the potential of microorganisms.

The museum’s Roger Highfield challenged Professor Alice Roberts to iron out the scars of human evolution for a new display. Here, the University of Birmingham anatomist describes her personal quest for perfection.

1 2 3 6